Tea Tree Pure Essential Oil

2.1 Tea Tree Small.jpg
Melaleuca alternifolia Tree.jpg
Tea Tree By By Tangopaso - Own work, Public Domain, httpscommons.wikimedia.orgwindex.phpcurid=19409797.jpg
Tea Tree Bark 1.jpg
Tea Tree By Köhler, F.E., Medizinal Pflanzen, vol. 2 t. 141 (1890) .jpg
2.1 Tea Tree Small.jpg
Melaleuca alternifolia Tree.jpg
Tea Tree By By Tangopaso - Own work, Public Domain, httpscommons.wikimedia.orgwindex.phpcurid=19409797.jpg
Tea Tree Bark 1.jpg
Tea Tree By Köhler, F.E., Medizinal Pflanzen, vol. 2 t. 141 (1890) .jpg

Tea Tree Pure Essential Oil

12.00

15 ml

Common Name: Tea Tree

Latin Name: Melaleuca alternifolia

INCI Name: Melaleuca Alternifolia (Tea Tree) Leaf Oil

 

Scent: Medicinal, camphoreous, astringent

Parts Used: Leaf

Extraction Method: Steam Distillation

Origin: Australia

Quantity:
Purchase

Blends Well With

Bergamot (Mint), Black Pepper, Cinnamon (Leaf), Clove (Bud), Cornmint, Eucalyptus, Frankincense, Helichrysum (Italicum), Helichrysum (Rambiazina), Lavender, Lemongrass, Patchouli, Peppermint, Petigrain, Sage (Clary), Spearmint, Wintergreen


Formula Cards – Coming Soon!


Plant Description

This tree or small shrub is a member of the of the myrtle family and is related to both Cajuput and Eucalyptus.  A shorter tree generally only reaching about 20 feet in height, Tea Tree prefers to grow in sunny, moist, well-drained locations. Its linear smooth leaves are abundant with oil glands.  This tree has a short blooming period from spring to early summer.

 

Plant History

The first recorded account of tea tree being used for medicinal purposes was in 1770, when Lieutenant James Cook used the leaves to treat scurvy among his sailors. By the 1930s and 1940s, tea tree oil was widely celebrated as an antiseptic treatment. During the Second World War, Australian soldiers were issued with tea tree oil in their first aid kits. [1]


Ancient Wisdom - Historical Uses

Bundjalung Aboriginal people from the coast of New South Wales treated wounds with Tea Tree by making a paste from the leaves which was applied to the affected area. 

Topically - abscess, acne, antibiotic, antifungal, antiseptic, antiviral, athlete’s foot, burns, candida, colds, cough, cystitis, dandruff, fever, flu, insect bites, itching, sinusitis, skin - oily, vaginitis, viral infection, warts, whooping cough, wounds …

Inhalation - colds, congestion, cough, flu, sinusitis, whooping cough …

 

Modern Knowledge – Scientific Research

J. May, C. H. Chan, A. King,  L. Williams, G. L. French. Time–kill studies of tea tree oils on clinical isolates. J. Antimicrob. Chemother. (2000) 45 (5): 639-643. doi: 10.1093/jac/45.5.639

http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/content/45/5/639.long

 

Going Super Geek – Advanced Reading

Follow the link below to a very good article regarding compounds found in Tea Tree Essential Oil increasing lipid dynamics.

Heverton Silva Camargos, Rodrigo Alves Moreira, Sebastião Antonio Mendanha,
Kelly Souza Fernandes, Miriam Leandro Dorta, Antonio Alonso. Terpenes Increase the Lipid Dynamics in the Leishmania Plasma Membrane at Concentrations Similar to Their IC50 Values. Published: August 7, 2014

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0104429

 

Active Compounds

1,8-cineole, terpinene-4-ol, alpha-terpinene, alpha-terpineol, gamma-terpinen, cineol, cymene, pinene, terpinen-4-ol, terpinolene …


Not For Internal Use

Keep Out Of Reach Of Children

Dilute Properly

Avoid Eyes & Mucus Membranes

 

Cautions

Possible Skin Sensitivity

 

If pregnant, nursing, taking medication or have a medical condition, consult your doctor prior to use.

If adverse reaction occurs, stop using immediately and seek appropriate medical attention.

 

Interaction

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should use herbs with care, under the supervision of a health care provider.

 

Use cautiously when used in people with linear IgA disease (an immune disease), as Tea Tree oil may cause a blistering disorder. [2]

 

Use cautiously when used with vancomycin, due to a potential interaction. [3]


Important

The information presented here is for educational purposes of traditional uses and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  The FDA has not evaluated the therapeutic suggestions, statements or claims sited.  No claims are made as to any medicinal value of this plant or any products from Earthwise Oils, LLC.  You are responsible for understanding the safe application of these products.  If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your healthcare provider prior to use.