Lavender Pure Essential Oil

2 Lavender Cutout Small.jpg
Lavender with Bee II(c) Laura Zielinski 2016.JPG
Lavender 3 (c) Laura Zielinski 2016.JPG
Lavender Flowers 1.jpg
Lavender growing in Laura's garden.
2 Lavender Cutout Small.jpg
Lavender with Bee II(c) Laura Zielinski 2016.JPG
Lavender 3 (c) Laura Zielinski 2016.JPG
Lavender Flowers 1.jpg
Lavender growing in Laura's garden.

Lavender Pure Essential Oil

12.00

15 ml

Common Name: Lavender

Latin Name: Lavandula

INCI Name: Lavandula (Lavender) Oil

 

Scent: Sweet, floral, herbaceous, lightly antiseptic

Parts Used: Flowers

Extraction Method: Steam Distilled

Origin: USA

Quantity:
Purchase

Blends Well With

Bergamot (Citrus), Bergamot (Mint), Black Pepper, Cajuput, Citronella, Clove (Bud), Cornmint, Eucalyptus, Frankincense, Geranium (Rose), Ginger, Helichrysum (Italicum), Helichrysum (Rambiazina), Lemongrass, Lime, Palmarosa, Patchouli, Peppermint, Sage (Clary), Spearmint, Tea Tree, Wintergreen, Ylang Ylang


Formula Cards – Coming Soon!


Plant Description

Lavender is a plant found in gardens around the world.  While there are a multitude of varieties, most are short-lived herbaceous perennials or shrub-like perennials with silver-green, needle-like foliage.  The whorled flowers are borne on spikes above the foliage.

 

Plant History

Lavender is believed to be native to the Old World; Africa, Asia, Europe and Mediterranean.  A member of the mint family, Lavender has a long illustrious history.  The use of this exceptional plant can be traced back more than 3,000 years having been employed by the ancient Egyptians, Romans, and Greeks, by Cleopatra, in biblical, medieval, Victorian, as well as modern times. 


Ancient Wisdom - Historical Uses

Lavender’s historical uses are many including cosmetic, culinary, medicinal, mummification, and perfumery.

Being one of the most useful oils around makes Lavender a must have.  Calms or stimulates according to your body’s needs.  Relaxes, soothes, restores and balances both body and mind.  This lovely oil is excellent for nervous anxiety, insomnia, melancholy, fear and stress.  Refreshes tired muscles, feet and head.  Treats burns and reduces scarring. It’s even great for discouraging mosquitos!  Lavender's uses are too many to list.

Topically – Acne, athlete's foot, bruises, burns, chicken pox, cuts, cystitis, dermatitis, dysmenorrhea, earache, headache, insect bites, insect repellant, itching, labor pains, migraine, oily skin, rheumatism, scabies, scars, sores, sprains, strains, stretch marks … [1]

Inhalation - Anxiety, asthma, colic, depression, headache, hypertension, labor pains, migraine, stress, vertigo, whooping cough … [2]

 

Modern Knowledge – Scientific Research

Following are several good articles on current Lavender research:

 

Effect of Inhaled Lavender and Sleep Hygiene on Self-Reported Sleep Issues: A Randomized Controlled Trialhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4505755/pdf/acm.2014.0327.pdf

 

The Effect of Massage With Lavender Oil on Restless Leg Syndrome in Hemodialysis Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trialhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4733501/

 

A randomized, assessor blind, parallel group comparative efficacy trial of three products for the treatment of head lice in children - melaleuca oil and Lavender oil, pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide, and a "suffocation" product                                            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2933647/pdf/1471-5945-10-6.pdf

 

Active Compounds Lavender Is Known For

Beta-Caryophyllene, camphor, cineole, coumarins, farnascene, geraniol and its esters, limonene, linalool, linalyl acetate, perillyl alcohol, rosmarinic acid, tannins, terpinenol, triterpenes …


Not For Internal Use

Keep Out Of Reach Of Children

Dilute Properly

Avoid Eyes & Mucus Membranes

 

Cautions

Avoid During Pregnancy

If pregnant, nursing, taking medication or have a medical condition, consult your doctor prior to use.

If adverse reaction occurs, stop using immediately and seek appropriate medical attention.

 

Interaction

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should use herbs with care, under the supervision of a health care provider.

Chloral Hydrate interacts with Lavender.

Chloral hydrate causes sleepiness and drowsiness. Lavender seems to increase the effects of chloral hydrate. Taking Lavender along with chloral hydrate might cause too much sleepiness. [3]

 

Sedative medications (Barbiturates) interacts with Lavender.

Lavender might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking Lavender along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness.

Some sedative medications include amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), pentobarbital (Nembutal), phenobarbital (Luminal), secobarbital (Seconal), and others. [4]

 

Sedative medications (CNS depressants) interacts with Lavender.

Lavender might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking Lavender along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness.

Some sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), phenobarbital (Donnatal), zolpidem (Ambien), and others. [5]


Important

The information presented here is for educational purposes of traditional uses and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  The FDA has not evaluated the therapeutic suggestions, statements or claims cited.  No claims are made as to any medicinal value of this plant or any products from Earthwise Oils, LLC.  You are responsible for understanding the safe application of these products.  If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your healthcare provider prior to use.


Literature

[1] [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-67.]

[2] [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-67.]

[3] http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-838-Lavender.aspx?activeingredientid=838

[4] http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-838-Lavender.aspx?activeingredientid=838

[5] http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-838-Lavender.aspx?activeingredientid=838