Ginger Pure Essential Oil

2 Ginger Small.jpg
red-gingerdesktopdress.com.jpg
Ginger 3 (c) Laura Zielinski 2016.jpg
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Ginger By By Franz Eugen Köhler - Köhlers Medizinal-Pflanzen in naturgetreuen Abbildungen und kurz erläuterndem Texte[1], Public Domain, httpscommons.wikimedia.orgwindex.phpc.jpg
2 Ginger Small.jpg
red-gingerdesktopdress.com.jpg
Ginger 3 (c) Laura Zielinski 2016.jpg
ginger-plant-absfreepic.com.jpg
Ginger By By Franz Eugen Köhler - Köhlers Medizinal-Pflanzen in naturgetreuen Abbildungen und kurz erläuterndem Texte[1], Public Domain, httpscommons.wikimedia.orgwindex.phpc.jpg

Ginger Pure Essential Oil

16.00

15 ml

Common Name: Ginger

Latin Name: Zingiber officinale

INCI Name: Zingiber Officinale (Ginger) Root Oil

 

Scent: Warm earthy, spicy

Parts Used: Root (rhizome)

Extraction Method: Steam Distillation

Origin: China

Quantity:
Purchase

Blends Well With

Bergamot (Citrus), Cinnamon (Leaf), Citronella, Clove (Bud), Frankincense, Geranium (Rose), Gingergrass, Grapefruit (Pink), Helichrysum (Italicum), Helichrysum (Rambiazina), Lavender, Lemongrass, Lime, Litsea, Palmarosa, Patchouli, Petigrain, Sage (Clary), Tangerine, Ylang Ylang


Formula Cards – Coming Soon!


Plant Description

Ginger, a perennial rhizome, spreads and grows in size underground. Both leaf and flower stalks sprout up directly from the rhizomes, dying back each season.  Leaves reach about 2 feet in height.  The white or yellowish-green flowers form from bracts.

 

Plant History

Native to tropical Asia, this pungent spicy rhizome has been used medicinally in Southeast Asia for 5,000 years.  Once considered a health tonic, ginger is now being studied for the myriad of uses it has been revered for through the millennia.  Spaniard Francisco de Mendosa brought ginger to the Americas from the East Indies.  Spanish-Americans cultivated ginger in such abundance that in 1547 they exported 22,053 cwt. into Europe. [1]


Ancient Wisdom - Historical Uses

The use of ginger being used for its medicinal qualities is recorded in early Sanskrit and Chinese literature.  It is listed in almost half of the thousands of prescriptions found in Chinese traditional medicine. 

Topically - aches caused by colds and flu, analgesic, anti-emetic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, arthritis pain, bactericidal, carminative, cephalic, dizziness, fevers, expectorant, febrifuge, headaches, laxative, menstrual pain, nausea, rubefacient, sore throat, stimulant, stomachic, sudorific, ulcerative colitis, vomiting …

 

Inhalation - anti-emetic, antiseptic, bactericidal, carminative, cephalic, dizziness, fevers, headaches, nausea, stimulant, vomiting …

 

Modern Knowledge – Scientific Research

Hunt R, Dienemann J, Norton J, et al. Aromatherapy as a Treatment for Postoperative Nausea: A randomized Trial. International Anesthesia Research Society. 2013:117(3):597-604.

http://journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/Fulltext/2013/09000/Aromatherapy_as_Treatment_for_Postoperative.10.aspx

 

Hur MH, Lee MS, Seong KY, et al. Aromatherapy massage on the abdomen for alleviating menstrual pain in high school girls: a preliminary controlled clinical study. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012;2012:187163(1-3).

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2013/742421/

 

Active Compounds Ginger Is Known For

(+)-alpha-curcumene, (+)-beta-phellandrene, 6-gingerol, 10-epizonarene, alpha-zingiberenes, n-butyraldehyde, n-decanal, n-nonane, n-nonanol, n-octane, n-propanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, bisabolene, camphene, caryophyllene, cis-beta-sesquiphellandrol, curcumene, diethylsulfide, ethyl-acetate, ethyl-isopropyl-sulfide, farnesene, gingerol, glyoxal, isovaleraldehyde, methyl-acetate, methyl-allyl-sulfide, methyl-caprylate, methyl-gingerol, methyl-glyoxal, methyl-isobutyl-ketone, nerolidol, propionaldehyde, sec-butanol, sesquithujene, shogaol, tert-butanol, zingerberone, zingerone, zingiberene, zingiberol, zonarene …


Not For Internal Use

Keep Out Of Reach Of Children

Dilute Properly

Avoid Eyes & Mucus Membranes

 

Cautions

Possible Skin Irritant

 

If pregnant, nursing, taking medication or have a medical condition, consult your doctor prior to use.

If adverse reaction occurs, stop using immediately and seek appropriate medical attention.

 

Interaction

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should take herbs with care, under the supervision of a healthcare provider.

 

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with GINGER

Ginger might slow blood clotting. Taking ginger along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), phenprocoumon (an anticlotting medicine available outside the US), and others. [2]

 

Phenprocoumon interacts with GINGER

Phenprocoumon is used in Europe to slow blood clotting. Ginger can also slow blood clotting. Taking ginger along with phenprocoumon might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your phenprocoumon might need to be changed. [3]

Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with GINGER

Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. Ginger can also slow blood clotting. Taking ginger along with warfarin (Coumadin) might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed. [4]

Minor Interaction Be watchful with this combination [5]

 

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with GINGER

Ginger might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking ginger along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others. [6]

 

Medications for high blood pressure (Calcium channel blockers) interacts with GINGER

Ginger might reduce blood pressure in a way that is similar to some medications for blood pressure and heart disease. Taking ginger along with these medications might cause your blood pressure to drop too low or an irregular heartbeat.

Some medications for high blood pressure and heart disease include nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan), diltiazem (Cardizem), isradipine (DynaCirc), felodipine (Plendil), amlodipine (Norvasc), and others. [7]


Important

The information presented here is for educational purposes of traditional uses and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  The FDA has not evaluated the therapeutic suggestions, statements or claims cited.  No claims are made as to any medicinal value of this plant or any products from Earthwise Oils, LLC.  You are responsible for understanding the safe application of these products.  If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your healthcare provider prior to use.