Clove (Bud) Pure Essential Oil

2.1 Clove (Bud) Small.jpg
Clove Tree By Prof. Chen Hualin - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, httpscommons.wikimedia.orgwindex.phpcurid=45498472.jpg
Clove Drying By Prof. Chen Hualin - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, httpscommons.wikimedia.orgwindex.phpcurid=45498472.jpg
Clove Flowers.jpg
Clove Syzygium_aromaticum_-_Köhler–s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-030 By Franz Eugen Köhler, Köhler's Medizinal-Pflanzen - List of Koehler Images, Public Domain, httpscommons.wikimedia.jpg
2.1 Clove (Bud) Small.jpg
Clove Tree By Prof. Chen Hualin - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, httpscommons.wikimedia.orgwindex.phpcurid=45498472.jpg
Clove Drying By Prof. Chen Hualin - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, httpscommons.wikimedia.orgwindex.phpcurid=45498472.jpg
Clove Flowers.jpg
Clove Syzygium_aromaticum_-_Köhler–s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-030 By Franz Eugen Köhler, Köhler's Medizinal-Pflanzen - List of Koehler Images, Public Domain, httpscommons.wikimedia.jpg

Clove (Bud) Pure Essential Oil

9.00

15 ml

Common Name: Clove

Latin Name: Stzygium aromaticum

INCI Name: Eugenia Caryophyllus (Clove) Bud Oil

 

Scent: Sweet, warm, aromatic

Parts Used: Buds

Extraction Method: Steam Distillation

Origin: Madagascar

Quantity:
Purchase

Blends Well With

Bergamot (Citrus), Bergamot (Mint), Black Pepper, Cajuput, Cinnamon (Leaf), Citronella, Cornmint, Eucalyptus, Frankincense, Geranium (Rose), Ginger, Gingergrass, Grapefruit (Pink), Helichrysum (Italicum), Helichrysum (Rambiazina), Lavender, Lemongrass, Lime, Litsea, Patchouli, Peppermint, Petigrain, Sage (Clary), Spearmint, Tangerine, Tea Tree, Wintergreen


Formula Cards

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Plant Description

Native to Indonesia, today cloves are mainly grown in Indonesia, India, Madagascar, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Zanzibar, with the Pemba Island in the Zanzibar archipelago being the largest producer.

Cloves are the unopened flower buds of the tree Syzygium aromaticum, a member of the Myrtaceae family.  This tree is an evergreen that grows up to 36 feet in height.  The buds are harvested when they turn from pale cream in color to bright red. 

 

Plant History

During the Han dynasty (207 BC - 220 AD) when addressing the emperor, one was required to hold cloves in their mouth to mask bad breath.  

A traditional component in Chinese medicine, clove is used for a myriad of conditions.

Since ancient times, clove has also been revered by Ayurvedic healers. European doctors in the 14th century breathed through clove-filled leather beaks, or plague mask, to ward off the plague.


Ancient Wisdom - Historical Uses

Historical uses of clove in America include anti-inflammatory, treating bacterial and protozoan infections, treating worms, viruses, candida, and various toothaches, bad breath, dizziness, cough, digestive upsets, a sleep-inducer, a blood-thinner, mental stimulant, etc.

Topically – anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, athlete’s foot, antioxidant, antiseptic, cold sores, headache, increase local blood flow, muscle aches, relieves pain, toenail fungus, vasodilator, warts …

Inhalation – Antimicrobial, depression, dizziness, mental stimulant, sleep-inducer …

 

Modern Knowledge – Scientific Research

This is a good article on the antimicrobial effects of clove and rosemary essential oils.

Antimicrobial activity of clove and rosemary essential oils alone and in combination.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17562569

 

Active Compounds Clove (Bud) Is Known For

Beta-Pinene, Campesterol, Caryophyllene, Caryophyllene-Oxide, Cinnamaldehyde, Cuminaldehyde, Daucosterol, Eugeniin, Eugenol, Eugenol-Acetate, Eugenyl-Acetate, Gallic-Acid, Kaempferide, Kaempferol, Linalool, Methyl-Salicylate, Oleanolic-Acid, Rhamnetin, Rhamnocitrin, Salicylates, Sesquiterpenes, Stigmasterol, …


Not For Internal Use

Keep Out Of Reach Of Children

Dilute Properly

Avoid Eyes & Mucus Membranes

 

Cautions

Avoid During Pregnancy

Avoid During Lactation

Do Not Use On Young Children

Possible Skin Sensitivity

 

If pregnant, nursing, taking medication or have a medical condition, consult your doctor prior to use.

 

If adverse reaction occurs, stop using immediately and seek appropriate medical attention.

 

Interaction

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should use herbs with care, under the supervision of a health care provider.

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with CLOVE

Clove might slow blood clotting. Taking clove oil along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Clove contains eugenol. Eugenol is the part of clove that might slow blood clotting. Eugenol is very fragrant and gives allspice and clove their distinctive smell.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others. [1]


Important

The information presented here is for educational purposes of traditional uses and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  The FDA has not evaluated the therapeutic suggestions, statements or claims cited.  No claims are made as to any medicinal value of this plant or any products from Earthwise Oils, LLC.  You are responsible for understanding the safe application of these products.  If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your healthcare provider prior to use.